Scene one, hot take one: Three top films of the decade and the scenes that made them the best

Film columnist Ben Hafetz PZ ’20 takes a look back at the best films of the 2010s, and the scenes that made them the greatest of the decade.

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Scene one, hot take one: Lost love and lost Oscars — A review of ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’

Ben Hafetz PZ ’20 discusses “Portrait of a Lady on Fire”‘s artful and aching portrayal of first love and why it warranted an Oscar nod.

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Outside the box office: Reasons to watch ‘Marriage Story’

Film columnist Hannah Avalos PO ’21 discusses the value of “Marriage Story” and its message to pursue love despite inevitable hardships.

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Scene one, hot take one: An Oscars preview — what will win, what should win and what should have been nominated

Film columnist Ben Hafetz PZ ’20 discusses the predictable, the mighty and the snubbed of the 92nd Academy Awards.

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Scene one, hot take one: Bong Joon-ho’s masterpiece ‘Parasite’ spotlights rise of lower class

Film columnist Ben Hafetz PZ ’20 reviews “Parasite,” the winner of the 2019 Sundance Palme d’Or and the film that has put director Bong Joon-ho in the limelight. “‘Parasite’ will be looked upon as a decade-defining film. Whether it be the camera, set design, themes, details, story, characters or gut-punch of an ending, it succeeds on every level,” he writes.

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Reel talk: ‘El Camino’ — An unnecessary but enjoyable epilogue to ‘Breaking Bad’

TV columnist Rachael Diamond SC ’21 considers the ramifications of ‘Breaking Bad’ epilogue ‘El Camino.’ “Despite being an inessential addition to Jesse’s story, the film certainly doesn’t detract from the magnificence of the show’s conclusion,” she writes.

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Reel talk: Lorene Scafaria’s star-studded “Hustlers” hustles its way into your heart

In this week’s film column, Rachael Diamond SC ’21 reviews “Hustlers,” praising its dramatic, yet touching portrayal of female friendship amidst financial hardship. She writes, “Regardless of the questionable moral dynamics at play, you leave the theater in utter admiration of Destiny’s and Ramona’s tenacity … a testament to the powerful allure of the film — and of money itself.”

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