In quarantine, childhood media gains relevance

Alyssa Leong SC ’23 discusses the exponential rise in popularity of various childhood television shows and book series during quarantine.

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Chew on this: The bitter taste of disparities in the presentation and popularization of food

Food columnist Stephanie Du SC ’21 discusses the disparities and difficulties of being a person of color consuming or creating food and food media. “We must acknowledge that each culture is different and food inequality exists. Respecting our differences and being conscious of our language and actions are steps forward to showing appreciation for varying cuisines and cultures,” she writes.

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Regularly scheduled programming: Anti-racist self-education can start with these 6 films

While supporting the Black Lives Matter movement can take on different forms, including signing petitions, donating to causes and attending protests, self-education through pop culture can be extremely useful in beginning to understand how and why systemic racism exists and persists in the U.S.

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A love affair with ‘chaotic’ energy: Claremont’s queer womxn and the embrace of chaos

Lillian Perlmutter SC ’21 examines the origin of the word “chaotic” and the significance of its frequent use in Claremont queer dating circles. “For some, to be chaotic, to attract and emit unwieldy intensity  — is a magnetic, magical quality, like being the human equivalent of a third tequila shot,” she writes.

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The quarantine chronicles: Ponderings on loss and leaving home for college

Jessica Shen-Wachter SC ’23 reflects on her weeks at home since her first year of college life was interrupted by a pandemic. “Though many stressors are very present in my life because of COVID-19, separation from my moms and my sister isn’t one of them. For better or for worse, time feels almost suspended in this moment of almost soothing monotony,” she writes.

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Framed: ‘Genesis’ is the divine judgment above Frary’s steps

You may recognize “Prometheus,” the grandiose mural watching over diners at Frary Dining Hall, but you have to look a bit closer to not miss another Frary mural, “Genesis,” hiding in plain sight. Art columnist Frances Sutton PO ’21 dives deep into this shadowy mural’s history.

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