HMC Continues $150 Million Fundraising Campaign

The Harvey Mudd College Office of College Advancement is in the middle of a campaign with a goal of raising $150 million that will go toward faculty salaries, financial aid, and projects such as the construction of a new residence hall. So far, the school has raised over $103 million.

Although the money will go to many different projects, there is an emphasis on the physical structure of the college and on experiential learning for students.

“We kind of
separate out the people and the programs, but experiential learning is a really
big thing here; it is sort of the hallmark of Harvey Mudd,” said Vice President for College Advancement Daniel Macaluso.

The money will be directed at projects related to the expansion of opportunities for experiential learning, investment in faculty
enrichment and curriculum development, and community outreach and
service. HMC hopes to raise $24 million for
program investment. 

In addition, as part of the Student Philanthropy Campaign, $5,566.88 was raised through student and matching donations. The money will help fund on-campus research for a student who has been unable to secure alternative funding, according to Travis Athougies HM ’14, the former president of the Associated Students of Harvey Mudd College.

While faculty members and administrators provided input on the school-wide campaign, students voted on where the Student Philanthropy fund would go, Athougies said. A prank fund was proposed, along with more practical ideas such as installing a coffee machine in Platt Student Center. 

Macaluso said that the school’s fundraising campaign is linked to HMC’s rebranding effort.

“The
branding was sort of the beginning,” Macaluso said. “We tried to unify the messaging that’s
already pretty consistent, and from that come out with sort of a theme which
was this phrase ‘Relationships matter.'”

The advancement office noted that although the college appears to be nearing its goal, a large portion of those funds were the result of a single unexpected donation, which the office has decided not to count in their progress toward the goal.

“The 103 is way past where we first thought we were going to be,” Macaluso said. “Typically, you try to raise about 40-50 percent in the first two and a half years, but we had one donor who gave an excess of $60 million, and because of that, you count it but you take it out of your projections and ask, ‘OK, if we didn’t have Mike Shanahan, where would we be?'”

Given this projection method, the advancement office considers the college to be over a quarter of the way toward the $150 million goal.

“We are staying on a 150 track even though it looks like we are blowing the doors off this thing,” Macaluso said.

Athougies spoke favorably about the campaign.

“I
think that all the goals are really important because all the goals are meant
to improve Mudd, and all of them are student-oriented,” he said. 

One outcome of the campaign is the brand-new R. Michael Shanahan Center for Teaching and Learning, which was completed this past fall. The college still has a goal of reaching $51 million for investing in projects such as the construction of a new residence hall and the renovation of academic spaces. 

Caroline Bowman contributed reporting.

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