CMC Admits Record Number of Women

With an admission rate of 10.1 percent, Claremont McKenna College’s class of 2018 has become the school’s most exclusive class in its 68-year history. Its admission rate—which, according to The Washington Post, is lower than those of Cornell University, Dartmouth College, and Northwestern University—is the lowest at the Claremont Colleges, with the other schools' rates ranging from 12.1 to 27 percent, as TSL reported April 4. CMC's rate is down from 11.7 percent last year, according to data reported by TSL and The New York Times.

“CMC’s reputation continues to grow nationally and globally,” wrote Georgette DeVeres, CMC’s director of admissions, in an email to TSL.

CMC’s class of 2018 is also distinctive for its gender composition: 55 percent of admitted students were women, the highest percentage of female students admitted in the school's history and the greatest total number of female students in any class at CMC.

In order to accommodate a possible larger class size next year, CMC has planned for 45 triple rooms—42 converted doubles and three permanent triples, an increase of 10 converted doubles from this year. According to CMC Director of Residential Life Eric Vos, all of the converted doubles may not end up being used, depending on the number of incoming students.

Vos wrote in an email to TSL that the use of double rooms as triples will be a temporary solution pending Mid Quad renovations to be completed in summer 2015.

Larissa Peltola CM '18, a recently admitted student, said that having more doubles and triples is a good idea.

“As a freshman, it’s good to have someone to hang out with, and being in a double or triple means that you at least have one or two people to explore CMC with,” she said. “I hope I get a double or a triple next year.”

Although CMC’s admitted class of 2018 also holds the school’s highest percentage rate of female accepted students at 55 percent, DeVeres wrote that the admission office “admits students based on their overall admission qualifications,” and denied that the school consciously aimed to admit more female students.

Many CMC students said that the gender ratio for the class of 2018 is positive for a school that was founded as a men’s college.

“As a woman and an intersectional feminist ending my first year here, I definitely have had experiences here feeling alienated from other women because male attention is so valued at the 5Cs in general,” Jordan Bosilijevac CM '17 said. “Maybe a higher percentage of women will help bolster this community.”

Still, Bosilijevac noted that numbers are not the most important factor.

“The number of women on campus is less important than the consciousness women create together, and that is something that I hope future classes pick up regardless of their demographics,” she said.

Ultimately, Bosilijevac said that more women at CMC will result in larger representation in campus-wide organizations.

“I look around campus at powerful organizations like ASCMC [Associated Students of Claremont McKenna College] and women are so underrepresented with their numbers climbing every year, and that echoes what is going on nationwide—women get the education but we see much fewer in government and high-ranking business,” she said.